Ingredient Showcase: Garlic

We don’t know about you but it certainly feels as though Spring has sprung today, the sun is shining (mostly!), it’s getting warmer and pretty daffodils and bluebells are in abundance everywhere. One foodie staple of spring is wild garlic which at this time of year can be found throughout the country along riversides and woodland. We thought we’d celebrate this humble bulb with a focus on some of the bestselling products containing it starting with cheese.

Lynher Dairies Cornish Yarg is undoubtedly one of our bestselling cheeses but did you know that they also produce a wild garlic variety? The cheese itself is made to the exact same recipe with the only difference being that rather than wrapped in nettles, the Garlic Yarg is wrapped in wild garlic leaves but the difference in flavour is simply staggering. The leaves impart a lovely gentle garlic flavour as well as slightly altering the texture of the cheese, making it firmer and less crumbly than the original. The team at Lynher pick their wild garlic from surrounding Cornish woodland each spring in an extremely limited time frame – normally only from mid-March to the end of April – the leaves are then wrapped around the cheeses and left to mature for up to six months. The Garlic Yarg is available in both whole 1.6kg rounds as well as half moons and retail pre-packs.

West Country Olives are a new addition to our product list with a variety of different flavours available. The garlic olives have already become one of the most popular flavours and with good reason for garlic lovers! These mammoth Halkidiki olives are hand stuffed with whole garlic cloves before being finished with minced garlic and rapeseed oil. These are available in individual 200g resealable pouches as well as 1kg catering packs.

Waterhouse Fayre are producers of a range of bestselling jams and chutneys including a slow roasted garlic chutney. The whole garlic is roasted for a total of four hours before red onion, spices and red wine vinegar is added and these are then cooked together for a further four hours. Anyone who has eaten roasted garlic on its own can atone for the delightful sweetness of flavour that it takes on and this chutney is no exception as it develops a lovely, sweet mellowness. The Waterhouse Fayre chutneys are available in trays of 6x325g jars.

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Cheese & Chutney Pairings

Cheeseboards are often seen as a festive treat however they can be enjoyed throughout the year especially on these long summer evenings. We’ve written previous blogs on what cheeses to put on a cheeseboard but for this one we are focusing on the best chutneys to pair with which cheeses to really bring out the best flavours in both products. The chutneys we recommend are from Waterhouse Fayre, a jam and chutney producer based on the outskirts of Tiverton.

Haystack Tasty Cheddar with Devon Ale Chutney
This cheddar from Barber’s Farmhouse Cheesemakers is deliciously strong with a sharp depth of flavour and delightfully crumbly texture. For such a strong cheese we recommend the Devon Ale chutney, this bestselling chutney is packed full of flavour and really holds up to the robustness of the cheddar. Made using local devon aleapples and onions together with ale from the Red Rock Brewery near Teignmouth, this is a truly Devonian product and makes a fantastic pairing to cheddar.

Tuxford & Tebbutt Stilton with Whortleberry Chutney
The classic Tuxford & Tebbutt Stilton is rich and creamy with a deliciously tangy finish combined with a soft, melt-in-the-mouth texture. This is one of our favourite cheeses and we struggled to match a chutney that didn’t detract from the wonderful flavour. Eventually we decided on this one with whortleberries. Whortleberry is the Devonian name for wild blueberries and this chutney really is a celebration of the fruit and the lovely, not overly sweet flavour perfectly compliments the tangy-ness of the Stilton.

Cornish Brie with Mango Chutney
This Brie from Trevarrian Creamery is mild and creamy with a smooth, buttery texture. We know that cranberries are the traditional accompaniment to Brie but we thought we would mix things up a bit and instead recommend this fruity Mango chutney. Made using chunks of ripe mango with fresh garlic and ginger mango briethis chutney certainly packs a punch and is a refreshing match for the creamy Brie.

Ticklemore Goat with Red Onion Marmalade
The Ticklemore Goat from Sharpham Cheese is smooth and light with a subtle lemony flavour and soft, crumbly texture. Goats cheese is another of our favourites so we didn’t want to overwhelm the delicate flavour and sometimes the classic pairings simply cannot be bettered. This Red Onion Marmalade is delightfully sweet which contrasts with the tangy flavour from the goats cheese – truly a match made in heaven.

Click here to view the full range of Waterhouse Fayre chutneys as well as their delicious jams.

Got another cheese pairing recommendation? Let us know via our social media pages below!Facebooktwitterinstagram

The Great West Country Dairy

Cheese has been made in Britain for thousands of years; our moderate climate, year round rain and lush rolling landscape make the country – and more importantly for us the West Country – ideal for dairy farming. As wine is renowned for its ‘terroir’ so cheese develops flavours unique to the grass, soil and climate in/on which the animals graze. In small scale dairies this results in cheeses with different depths of flavour dependent upon these factors which sets them apart from manufactured cheese and production line dairies. In the following blog we explore three West Country dairies and the delicious cheeses that they produce.

The Barber family have been producing their traditional farmhouse cheddar since 1833, making them the world’s oldest surviving cheddar-makers. Daniel Barber began making cheese on Maryland Farm in rural Somerset mainly for his family and farm workers using milk from his own herd of cows. However as demand for the cheese grew more milk was needed and by the 1950’s the family were working with surrounding farms to barbers maturekeep up production.
Today the farm is still very much a family business who have not lost their passion for cheese-making. Time honoured techniques and recipes passed down through the generations combined with modern technology have ensured the longevity of this traditional cheddar. We stock a wide range of Barber’s cheeses including the Vintage Reserve 1833, the Mellow cheddar and the Haystack Tasty as well as their Red Leicester and Double Gloucester cheeses. Click here to view the whole Barber’s lynher dairiesrange.

Lynher Dairies are producers of the award-winning Cornish Yarg cheese. First made in the 1980s on Bodmin Moor by Alan Grey, who found the 17th century recipe for nettle-wrapped cheese in his attic, Yarg is now made by Catherine Mead at their custom built dairy near Truro. Other cheeses include a Garlic Yarg, Stithians cheese and the Cornish Kern which won Supreme Champion at the World Cheese Awards in 2017. The yargrich Cornish milk used in the cheese-making process comes from their own herd of Aryshire cows and is also sourced from nearby farms. This coupled with the cheese-makers’ experience and expertise results in some truly delicious cheeses. We currently stock the classic Yarg and the Garlic version.

Robin Congdon was the original pioneer behind ticklemore cheeseTicklemore Cheese Dairy. In the 1970’s he began reviving the tradition of sheep milking in the UK and, with thirty sheep on a smallholding near Exeter, began producing yogurt and soft cheeses. Soon he and his partner Maurice Ash expanded the business to a larger farm on the banks of the River Dart where the Beenleigh Blue and later Harbourne Blue and Devon Beenleigh3Blue cheeses were developed. The 1980’s were an exciting time for producing speciality cheeses and a larger dairy was built to accommodate new varieties including Ticklemore Goat and Devon Rustic – both of which were given to Sharpham Creamery once production needed to be simplified. We stock their Devon Blue and Beenleigh Blue cheeses.

There are many more dairies and cheeses that we could have mentioned here which proves just how lucky we are to live and work in this beautiful county. The hard work of dairy owners and the expertise of its cheese-makers ensures that the West Country cheese remains a renowned speciality.Facebooktwitterinstagram

Extended Delivery Routes!

This year we are all about extensions; following recent building work we have been able to extend our fridge space meaning that we can stock more products and supply to more customers. Our office space is also currently undergoing work which will improve the day to day running of the business.

The result of all this work is that we are now excited to be able to extend our delivery routes to include more areas and ultimately supply to more customers; from small village stores and community shops to cafes, farm shops and delis.

Currently the extended routes are in Somerset, Cornwall and Mid Devon but we hope to be able to extend all routes in the coming months. Click here to see when we are able to deliver in your area or give us a call on 01392 661001.Facebooktwitterinstagram

Award-Winning Cheeses!

Last week was the prestigious World Cheese Awards this year held in Bergamo, Italy as part of the city’s annual FORME cheese festival. A record 3804 cheeses were entered to be judged in a single day by teams of technical experts, buyers, retailers and food writers on their colour, texture, consistency and taste. A number of our local cheeses were recipients of awards ranging from Bronze to Gold including Sharpham Cheese, Quicke’s Cheese, the Cornish Cheese Co and Lynher Dairies.

Sharpham Rustic with Chive & Garlic
rustic chiveMade by Sharpham Dairy on the Sharpham Estate in Totnes, South Devon this won Silver at the World Cheese Awards last week. A semi-hard unpasteurised cheese made from Jersey cows milk it is full of rich, pungent garlic flavours underlined by a lovely creaminess with a soft, edible white rind. The team at Sharpham employ traditional techniques paired with a wealth of expertise to create their range of fantastic cheeses and are certainly no strangers to awards. Their Rustic Plain, sister cheese to the chive version, won Gold at last years International Cheese Awards while the Ticklemore Goat also won Silver at the World Cheese awards this year. Their range of cheeses are available in whole 1kg rounds as well as 150g retail packs.

Cornish Yarg
This wild nettle wrapped cheese is made by Lynher Dairies on their farm in ruralcornish yarg Cornwall using milk from both their own herd of Ayrshire cows and cows from carefully selected local farms. The nettles are hand picked from hedgerows in early spring and then frozen so that they last all year round. Wrapped around the cheese before the 4-5 week maturation, the leaves impart a delicate, mushroom flavour and the nettles themselves develop an attractive white bloom. This is a deliciously fresh and creamy cheese which clearly appealed to the judges as it won Gold at this years awards. Other cheeses made by the dairy have also been the recipient of many awards over the years including the prestigious Supreme Champion at the 2017 World Cheese Awards for their Cornish Kern and their Wild Garlic wrapped Yarg also won Gold at this years awards. The Yarg is available in whole 3kg rounds as well as 150g retail packs.

Congratulations to all winners at the World Cheese Awards!Facebooktwitterinstagram

Cheese Showcase – Cornish Blue

This Cornish Blue cheese is made by the Cornish Cheese Co. on Stansfield’s Farm on the edge of Bodmin Moor. Established in 2001 founders Philip and Carol Stansfield were facing falling milk prices and in a search of a new revenue came up with the initiative of moving to cheesemaking. The only problem was that neither of them knew how to make cheese; Phillip promptly enrolled on a cheesemaking course at Cheshire College of Agriculture and the reality of Cornish Blue was born.

cornish blue (2)

Made using the milk from their own herd on the family farm, the milk is immediately taken to cheese production – only travelling a few yards to do so. Once the cheese is produced it moves to the maturing room where unlike traditional English blues, it only stays for between 12-14 weeks. This makes it a delightfully creamy and gently sweet cheese with none of the saltiness commonly found in blues. It has a dense, moist texture and its mellow flavour makes it very versatile in cooking or as part of a cheeseboard.

Cornish Blue became internationally renowned after it was named Champion at the World Cheese Awards in 2010 and since then won a string of awards including Best Blue and Best English Cheese.Facebooktwitterinstagram

All About Brie

A soft cheese named after the French region from which it originated, Brie is a much loved classic, the most famous being Brie de Meaux and Brie de Melun which both have protected designation of origin status however unlike its English contemporaries such as Farmhouse Cheddar and Stilton, the generic name Brie was not protected and is now used to describe any soft, bloomy rinded cheese. There are now many varieties available all over the world, a few are also made here in the South West and we’ve listed some of our favourites below.

Somerset Brie
Made by Lubborn Creamery in the lush valley of Cricket St Thomas, this brie is made to traditional methods, allowing it to soften and ripen from the outside in and develop its fresh creamy flavours and soft, edible white rind. Pasteurised and suitable for vegetarians this is one of our best selling Bries.

Sharpham
Hand made using unpasteurised Jersey cows milk on Sharpham Dairy in Totnes, South Devon this mould-ripened Coulommiers style cheese has unique rich, buttery flavours and a soft, creamy texture. It is matured for four weeks during which time it grows its edible bloomy rind and gradually ripens from chalky to soft and gooey.

Tim_Schofield_Photo_150520-83 (1)St Endellion
A decadent version of classic Cornish Brie the St Endellion is enriched with locally made double cream for a rich, full bodied flavour. Made by the team at Trevarrian Creamy near Newquay the texture softens as it ripens and the cheese develops its characteristic golden colour, soft pale rind and deliciously creamy interior.

Any of these Bries are a perfect addition to cheeseboards, their soft, creamy texture makes an interesting contrast to the hard cheese options. Sharpham in particular is great melted on roasted vegetables and the St Endellion makes a fantastic dessert cheese while the Somerset Brie is delicious baked in the oven with some rosemary. However you like your Brie try one of these and we promise you won’t be disappointed.Facebooktwitterinstagram

Women & Cheesemaking

Women have traditionally always been involved in cheesemaking. Famers wives and daughters were passed down cheese recipes and would control the dairy, making the butter, milking the cows and making the cheese. These women have inspired a new generation of quality, artisan cheesemakers and in celebration of their achievements we have explored the history and lives of three of Devon’s own women cheesemakers and the excellent cheeses they produce.

quicke matureMary Quicke is the 14th generation of the Quicke family working on Home Farm, Newton St Cyres. Managing the cheese business since 1987, Mary has become a leading voice on traditional cheese production and in 2017 launched the Academy of Cheese; a not for profit organisation promoting cheese knowledge for both the industry and the wider public. She has also applied her cheese expertise to judging at the World Cheese Awards, British Cheese Awards and the American Cheese Society Awards. It’s no surprise that her cheeses have been award winning themselves; Quicke’s Traditional Mature, a rich, complex cheese with flavours ranging from buttery caramel to sharp and grassy, won 2 stars at the Great Taste Awards earlier this year while Quicke’s Oak Smoked, a well balanced mature naturally smoked over oak chips for four hours, scooped Gold at this years Artisan Cheese Awards. A passion for creating beautiful cheeses and an undefinable link to the land her family have worked for generations makes Mary Quicke a woman to be reckoned with.

Curworthy Cheese was originally owned by Farmers Weekly, who were belstonepublishing a column on the everyday workings of dairy farming; on launch day Rachel Stephens was asked to help out as a ‘cheese cutter’. When it came time for the newspaper to sell the business, Rachel took a chance and moved the dairy to a purpose built creamery on her own farm a few miles away. For the first twenty years of production the milk used to make their cheeses came from their own herd, however it is now bought in ‘raw’ from local dairies and pasteurised themselves. As well as making the cheeses four days a week Rachel and the team also sell their cheese at various local markets and on a Tuesday this brings them to The Cheese Pantry, their small cheese shop in Hatherleigh market full of both their own cheeses and other locally made delights. A firm favourite of ours is their Devon Oke, made to a recipe dating back to the 17th century, it is mellow and creamy with buttery flavours and firm texture. In contrast to this classic recipe is the relatively new Dartmoor Chilli; made using Ring of Fire chillies from nearby Dartmoor Chilli Farm and encased in distinctive red wax it has a slight mellow sweetness which is in contrast with the hot chillies. Cheesemaking can be a tough, physically demanding job, the cheeses are heavy and at Curworthy they are regularly turned to ensure even maturation, however it must be incredibly rewarding making and selling handmade cheese to the public. The cheese industry is full of interesting people and Rachel is certainly one of them.

Cornish Yarg in the world. Today, Catherine leads one of the most successful artisan cheese producers in the world and not only that, she is also investing in the future of cheesemaking. She has designed an apprenticeship in cheese-making with Duchy College and is Chair of Jamie Oliver’s charity Fifteen Cornwall – a project aimed at developing understanding of raw ingredients, the science behind food and the importance of locally sourced produce. Her cheeses have been multi-award winning; the original Yarg won Gold at the 2017 World Cheese Awards while the Garlic version won Silver at this years British Cheese Awards. The fresh, creaminess of Yarg is complimented by the subtle mushroom flavours imparted from the nettle leaves wrapped around the cheese. These nettles are harvested in Cornwall by a team of gloved pickers before being rinsed and steamed ready to be used for wrapping. The Garlic Yarg is made to the same recipe as the original and it is the nettles that impact so significantly on the different flavours. The wild garlic leaves impart a gentle garlic flavour and provide a slightly firmer texture than the original. Catherine has built up a thriving business from a traditional recipe, her cheeses are now world renowned and she is involved in training the next generation of cheesemakers, ensuring that the artisan cheese industry continues to survive.

These three women have risen to the top of their field and all have had an impact on the cheese industry, from experimenting with new flavours and methods, deciding the big cheese winners and inspiring the next generation. Their own cheeses are superb and we hope they will continue to be made for years to come.Facebooktwitterinstagram

The Best Cornwall Cheeses! (in our opinion)

In 2017 Cornish Kern, made by Lynher Dairies, was voted as the World’s Best Cheese at the annual World Cheese Awards. As a relatively small dairy this was a huge achievement and got us thinking about other great cheeses originating from our neighbouring county, we’ve listed a few of our favourite Cornish cheeses to nibble on below.

Cornish Blue
Cornish Blue is made by the Cornish Cheese Company using local Cornish milk from a family farm on the edge of Bodmin Moor. The cheese differs from its traditional counterparts in that it is designed to be eaten when young, making its flavours much more mild, creamy and slightly sweet than its tangy cousins. The cheese production process is entirely carried out by hand by highly skilled cheesemakers, resulting in a delicious, crumbly blue cheese.

Miss Thymed
This creamy, delicate cheese is made by Whalesborough Cheese, a small batch artisan cheese makers based on the North Cornwall coast. Miss Thymed was created by taking their sweet, continental style Miss Muffet and blending it with Lemon & Thyme Cornish Sea Salt, creating a delicious citrus cheese perfectly complimented by nutty, savoury undertones.

Cornish Medium Gouda
This cheese is hand crafted by Giel Spierings and the skilled cheesemakers of the Cornish Gouda Company, based near Looe and producers of artisan cheeses. The cheese is made using rich milk from the farms own herd of Holstein Friesian cows and traditional Dutch cheese making techinques. It is matured for 5-6 months and is smooth and creamy with nutty flavours.

Garlic Yarg
Yarg is made by Lynher Dairies, one of the most successful artisan cheese makers in the country, who are based in Ponsanooth, Cornwall. This cheese is made to the same recipe as their award winning Yarg with the addition of wild garlic leaves which lends a gentle, fresh savoury flavour to the creamy, mild cheese as it matures.

These small scale dairies prove that local, natural ingredients, fresh, rich milk and highly skilled cheesemakers produce the best cheese – and even better, their right next door!Facebooktwitterinstagram

Vegetarian Cheeses

Traditional cheese making techniques require the use of rennet in the ‘curdling’ process whereby the curds and whey are separated, the problem with this for vegetarians is that this rennet is sourced from the stomach of young calves. Luckily many cheeses produced in the UK are now made using alternative rennet such as fungal/bacterial sources and genetically modified micro-organisms. However there are some cheeses such as Parmesan, Grana Padano and Gorgonzola that have to be produced to traditional methods including the use of calf rennet, these are therefore unsuitable for vegetarians. While the following list is not by any means exhaustive, it includes some of our most popular cheeses made using vegetarian rennet.

tawvalleyrange_ck6q-r8We’ll start with traditional Cheddar; all of our Taw Valley, Maryland and Ford Farmhouse range are suitable for vegetarians.
Based in North Tawton, Devon the Taw Valley master cheesemakers use high quality milk sourced from local farms and traditional recipes to produce great tasting cheeses. Barbers of Maryland Farm are one of the few farms awarded Protection of Designation of Origin status meaning that their Cheddar is made to exacting standards including using milk sourced from Devon, Cornwall, Somerset or Dorset, using traditional techniques such as ‘cheddaring’ and allowing the cheese to mature for at least nine months. Ford Farm are based in Dorset and have been producing Cheddar for over forty years using methods and recipes dating back over 600 years.

Quickes are producers of traditional cloth bound cheeses and while some of their range uses animal rennet they also have a range suitable for vegetarians including their Elderflower cheese. Based near Exeter in Devon the team make all the cheese by hand using techniques which have been passed through the generations for over 500 years. This elderflower cheese is a fresh and creamy Cheddar with real elderflower running through it. It is delicately scented with rich and buttery flavours.

Devon Blue is made by Ticklemore Cheese near Totnes, Devon without the use of rennet making it suitable for vegetarians. Made using unpasteurised Friesian cows’ milk sourced from local dairies, it is allowed to mature for up to eight months to allow the flavour to fully develop and is moist, slightly crumbly in texture with buttery rich flavours.

Tim_Schofield_Photo_150520-83Cornish Brie is made by Trevarrian Creamery on the North Cornwall coast using locally sourced milk, this rich Cornish milk is what gives the brie its characteristic yellow, buttery colouring. Best of all it is made using vegetarian rennet with a soft and silky texture and mild, creamy flavour. For added luxury try their St Endellion Brie which is made with added double cream and still suitable for vegetarians.

Check out our website for the full range of cheeses suitable for vegetarians and discover something new!Facebooktwitterinstagram